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Recruit and Specialty Training

Transcript:

>> LAURA SCHOOLCRAFT: As we journeyed with our son through his recruit training, just watching the transformation in him was amazing. And it was communicated through his letters home, that it--he was becoming--he was becoming a Marine. >> BGEN. GERALD MILLER: Well, I think the thing that--that struck me the most was the value of integrity that was demonstrated by the drill instructors and by others who were in charge. And that was what was expected of you. >> STEVE TALLENT: He really revered these drill instructors and would--would go on about the--just their character, their strength, their dedication to duty. >> CAPT. DAVID DENIAL: What we're doing here is we're transforming a civilian into a Marine. And that transformation process takes 12 weeks and a lot of training. >> MAJ. JASON SMITH: I think the best value that came out of entry-level training was the reordering of priorities. Your worth is what you bring to the team as a whole, not what the team does for you. 00:01:04:00 >> JOE LISI: When the Marine Corps takes you in as a recruit and then makes you strive to achieve the goal of becoming a Marine, you're doing something. You're tested to the limits, whether it's physical strength, mental stress, durability, all of those things, that's what they do. >> CAPT. CARRIE BATSON: The Marine Corps gives you the tools to succeed. There are constant challenges. But you're never--I've never been left with the feeling that I didn't know what to do. You know, obviously, you might need to think about what the plan should be, the strategy that you're going to take to solve a problem. But really, the Marine Corps, the training that you get sets you up for those kinds of situations to be successful. >> KRISTEN OCHES: I really had no idea of all the training that the Marines went through and how the Marine Corps makes sure that the recruits are really prepared. >> DONNA ROBERTS: Well, I guess there's several things that made me more comfortable with Henry's decision to join the Corps. One is that he was going to get the best training. It wasn't going to be halfway done. It wasn't going to be, "you can do it if you want to." So I knew that he would be ready. >> LUIS CASTRO: Both of our kids are going to be in Afghanistan at the same time, so we're not thrilled about it. But we know that with the training that they've received and the motivation and the guidance that we've given them, we know that they'll make it through. >> MAJ. STEPHEN COSBY: Going into Afghanistan, I learned that the things that I had trained for years to do, I was able to do those, you know, with no problem. So it was good to actually validate that. >> BGEN. GERALD MILLER: It is remarkable how well-trained the young Marines are for the dangers and challenges that are going to face them wherever they go, and particularly on the battlefield. >> CAPT. KURTIS SARGENT: There are Marines that are here that are up all night making preparations to go to another part of the world and--and fight for what they believe in. It happens every day. 00:03:02:22
 

Marine Corps training happens in several stages. In order to prepare for life as a Marine, your son or daughter must first go to Recruit Training and then to Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) Training (MOS is the term for a Marine's job).

Recruit Training will teach them essential values, skills and discipline. This is where they will earn the title “Marine.”

Following Recruit Training, new Marines will attend several weeks of MOS training to learn the skills to perform their assigned specialties.

Marine Corps Recruit Training is an intentionally difficult 12 weeks of academic, physical and moral preparation.

It takes place at just two Recruit Depots: Parris Island, South Carolina and San Diego, California. Young men will train at the depot in their region, east or west, while all young women train at Parris Island. Men and women at Parris Island train in separate platoons.

Recruit Training is notoriously tough. We have to maintain the highest standards and push recruits hard so they will be able to perform their assigned jobs under pressure while keeping themselves and fellow Marines safe.

Drill Instructors are experienced Marines with expert skills, assigned specifically to the recruit depots with the task of making new Marines. They have a responsibility to our nation, to the Marine Corps, and to you: to make sure without a doubt that each individual, and the group, is prepared to move forward.

Every task, challenge and lesson of Recruit Training has a specific purpose. See video from the Drill Instructor's view and learn the purpose of various Recruit Training activities in our 12 Weeks module on Marines.com.

Recruit Training happens in three phases:

In Phase One, Weeks 1-4, gear is issued, physical examinations are conducted and the Initial Strength Test is administered. Recruits learn the Marine Corps values of Honor, Courage and Commitment and learn to put the well-being of their fellow recruits before their own. They will begin to learn weapons handling and complete the 11-obstacle Confidence Course. During this time, recruits can receive letters but nothing else. Please don't send gifts or supplies. Address letters to your “Recruit,” not to “Private” or “Marine.” This is a title your son or daughter will earn over the next 12 weeks.

In Phase Two, Weeks 5-9, recruits take the swim qualification if they haven’t already in Phase One. Recruits hone their close-combat skills and master Marksmanship Training, developing proficiency and confidence with their weapon. They continue academic and Core Values lessons as well.

In Phase Three, Weeks 10-12, Recruits engage in simulated combat and Basic Warrior Training. Each Recruit must then pass The Crucible—a 54-hour exercise of physical and mental endurance that emphasizes teamwork, determination and discipline. The support of their fellow recruits, as well as what they’ve learned so far, gets them through this intense challenge.

At the Emblem Ceremony, new Marines receive the Eagle, Globe and Anchor emblem from their Drill Instructors. It signifies that they have earned the right to be called a United States Marine.

Then, the Recruit Training graduation ceremony presents these new Marines to the world. You are invited and encouraged to attend the graduation weekend, which includes special family activities. For many families and friends, this is the proudest moment they have shared with their Marine.

Marine Officer candidates will complete their own initial training during or after college to earn the commission to lead Marines. This training is Officer Candidates School (OCS).

Instructors at OCS train, screen and evaluate candidates’ leadership skills and Marine values. They prepare these candidates to “Lead By Example.” Upon completing OCS and earning the title “Marine Officer,” the new Lieutenants will complete The Basic School, further developing leadership and management skills before continuing to specialized training.

After Recruit Training or Officer Candidates School and The Basic School, respectively, Enlisted Marines and Officers will complete MOS training.

Marine MOS schools give Marines the knowledge of Military Occupational Specialties—the jobs or fields in which Marines work to support the mission. This hands-on training gives them expert knowledge of the field to which they have been assigned. The schools are located throughout the country and last for many weeks or months.

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Comments (36)

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April Phelps Avatar

Mother

Hello,

I am new to this website. To explain, my son is at MCRD San Diego, and he left June 14th, so that means he is in his fifth week, right? I am wondering if someone can give more details as to Swim Week and Grass Week, and the other kinds of training the Recruits go through from weeks 5-9 in more detail? As his mom, I served in the Army from 1997-2001 as a Chemical Operations Specialist, whereas my son wants to be Military Intel. I am wondering if you can please share with me where his MOS school is located. Last but not least; Don't the Recruits when they graduate as Marines, also have to go to SOI (School of Infantry) School before attending thier MOS school?

Thank you for helping a Veteran and Mom out,

Spc April Phelps

Posted by: April Phelps on 07/27/2010

Helpful?

339

 
 
 

Kenneth Bennett Avatar

Father

Is there a way I can confirm my son's garduation and family days? He told me the date before he left and I remember it as 11/03/10 but I am starting to doubt myself. I need to arrange for the time of so any help from anyone would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by: Kenneth Bennett on 09/06/2010

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249

 
 
 

Community Manager Avatar

COMMUNITY MANAGER

Depending on where your son is completing recruit training, you can find the graduation dates on the following Marine Corps websites. They are divided according to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego.

MCRD Parris Island Graduation Dates:
http://www.mcrdpi.usmc.mil/graduation/grad_dates.asp

MCRD San Diego Graduation Dates:
http://www.mccsmcrd.com/News/News_Recruit_Graduation_Dates_2010.aspx

Posted by: Community Manager on 09/13/2010

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246

 
 
 

Rafael Trujillo Avatar

Father

Last update was GREAT help. My son was shipped on Oct 25th. I can see on that chart the Company is B and Platoon is 1029-1033. Am I reading correctly the chart? Can I send a letter to that Platoon?

Posted by: Rafael Trujillo on 10/29/2010

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227

 
 
 

Joshua Montaño Avatar

Other

Hello

My name is Joshua im from Mexico city, and i really want to join to the United States Marine Corps, Why? cause I want to be the best i dont wanna be a Marine to make money or to get a Green Card, I really want to be better person and serve to the United States of America, but i dont know how i can join the USMC, i really need help with that, maybe an email or something? please help.

Thanks

Regards

Posted by: Joshua Montaño on 03/29/2011

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166

 
 
 

Community Manager Avatar

COMMUNITY MANAGER

Joshua,
You must be a United States citizen or legal immigrant to enlist in the Marine Corps. Once a Marine, non-citizens are eligible for naturalization, and many general naturalization requirements may be diminished or waived for qualifying service members. You can find more information on citizenship and military service at http://bit.ly/hFpH4T or contact a Marine Corps recruiter at http://bit.ly/eDsX6R. />
-LifeAsAMarine.com Community Manager

Posted by: Community Manager on 03/30/2011

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137

 
 
 

sean hicks Avatar

Other

Hello

My name is Sean i was wondering can anyone tell me how long the average MOS training is (in weeks please)? Its very important to me because I'm wanting to join the Marine Corps but with my son and my wife its a difficult decision. It probably wouldn't be so hard but i feel something is missing from my life and i always wanted to join the Military. Any other information on how long it would be before they could join me i would love to have.
Thanks

Posted by: sean hicks on 04/06/2011

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171

 
 
 

Community Manager Avatar

COMMUNITY MANAGER

Sean,
After graduation from recruit training, Marines attend the School of Infantry (SOI) - those with an Infantry Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) are trained at Infantry Training Battalion (ITB) over the course of 52 days, and those with a non-Infantry MOS are trained at Marine Combat Training Battalion (MCT) over the course of 29 days. Upon completion of SOI, non-Infantry MOS Marines attend their MOS school, which entail differing lengths, graduation requirements, and locations. All Marines are then assigned to a unit with a Permanent Duty Station (PDS), and may be deployed overseas if their unit is ordered to do so. Learn more about recruit training by contacting a recruiter <a href=" http://www.marines.com/rmi">here</a>.


-LifeAsAMarine.com Community Manager

Posted by: Community Manager on 04/06/2011

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167

 
 
 

Graysen Hansen Avatar

Family

Hey,

my name is Graysen, I'm a freshman in high school and I want to become a Marine. One thing that I wanted to know was what would be a yearly salary if i go through the ROTC program, and what assets are taken care of (that I don't have to pay for). I'd love to hear back soon thanks!

Posted by: Graysen Hansen on 04/10/2011

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185

 
 
 

Devin Wilgis Avatar

Supporter

Hello, my name is Devin and I have a question regarding enlistment. In 2009 I received traffic tickets that were put on a "stet docket." Am I eligible to enlist?

Posted by: Devin Wilgis on 04/14/2011

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207

 
 
 

CHARLY mupiri Avatar

Other

MY NAME'S CHARLY, I m from africa but I live in russia. I'm student . I like the USMC. What I can to do for taking this opportinity becoming a marine us.

Posted by: CHARLY mupiri on 04/30/2011

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146

 
 
 

Christian Gonzalez Morales Avatar

Other

how long is the supply administration and operations clerk training..?

Posted by: Christian Gonzalez Morales on 05/04/2011

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137

 
 
 

Christian Gonzalez Morales Avatar

Other

my name is Christian . Im 17 and I from Puerto Rico. I like to become a USMC. I like to know how long is the motor transport school training and the Supply school training.. thank u!

Posted by: Christian Gonzalez Morales on 05/05/2011

Helpful?

153

 
 
 

TRAVIS LANE Avatar

Former Marine

PARRIS ISLAND JULY 1979-SEPTEMBER 1979 OORAH''' NO OTHER EXPERIENCE LIKE IT

Posted by: TRAVIS LANE on 07/21/2011

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120

 
 
 

Vivian Daily Avatar

Other

I have a question.....can you enlist and never see overseas duty? Is there a choice? Thank You.

Posted by: Vivian Daily on 08/09/2011

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180

 
 
 

Mary Schmidbauer Avatar

Mother

Question.

My son started his training in MCT San Onofre on August 9, 2011. Will he have a graduation ceremony after the 22 days of combat training and will we, his parents, be able to attend at this time?

Posted by: Mary Schmidbauer on 08/15/2011

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136

 
 
 

griffin craig Avatar

Other

my name is griffin i am 15 years old and have had an ACL surgery and have fully recovered. Am I a still able to enlist?

Posted by: griffin craig on 08/17/2011

Helpful?

144

 
 
 

Dee Carine-Calabrese Avatar

Mother

My son asked for Graphics, Engineering but was give Cook. What does this mean and how does it affect his college desires for desing/engineering? Pls advise.

Posted by: Dee Carine-Calabrese on 08/23/2011

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200

 
 
 

Cynthia Cobian Avatar

Other

I am 23 years old hispanic women, dont speak english verry well, i live in San diego, Ca. I want to become a marine. but i dont know how i can join the USMC, i really need help. Thank you.

Posted by: Cynthia Cobian on 08/28/2011

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130

 
 
 

Karl Wallace Avatar

Other

Upon entering are you able to pick your career?

Posted by: Karl Wallace on 09/03/2011

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199

 
 
 

Sydney Horsley Avatar

Supporter

My name is Sydney i'm only 13 but i have my heart dedicated to USMC. I don't know how to tell my parents that i want to become part of this. I also have a BIG fear of heights. Any suggestions?

Posted by: Sydney Horsley on 11/02/2011

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110

 
 
 

ORLANDO AVILES Avatar

Other

I am 22 years old. I enlisted 4 years ago right after high school, I was ready to go to recruit training but did not choose to go afterwards due to personal reasons witht the recruiter. Now I want to re-join, will that past event affect me now in an shape or form to enlist once again?

Posted by: ORLANDO AVILES on 12/12/2011

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171

 
 
 

Sami Malhas Avatar

Other

Hello, I am a 15 year old sophomore high school student and would like to join the mariens as a C-130 pilot, would it help my chances to have a private pilot liscence? Also what's the exact steps I would take after boot camp?

Posted by: Sami Malhas on 01/11/2012

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70

 
 
 

Andrew Chandler Avatar

Other

hello im 18 and a senior in high school i have had 3 knee serguries because of genetics i have completely healed from my latest knee sergury which was back in november of 2011 i can leg press 280 easy on 1 leg and am wondering if i can still join

I also dont know how to explain this to my parents so that they will back me up any one help me

Posted by: Andrew Chandler on 02/28/2012

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73

 
 
 

Ca McA Avatar

Supporter

Hi, I was wondering how one past incident of self-harm would affect me becoming a Marine? It was when I was ten or eleven years old, and I've never suffered depression, nor did I get psychiatric help. I've never been institutionalised and it was just once, so would that require a waiver?

Posted by: Ca McA on 03/04/2012

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88

 
 
 

Amiran Urusov Avatar

Other

Hello. My name is Amiran Urusov. I am from Russia. I want to join the U.S. Marines. I'm 18. I want the army, but in Russia I am not allowed to serve, because I have a little weight and want to serve in the army. It's Russia, you know what I'm talking about. I graduated from high school. Can you talk me what the documents i need? Can I join the USMC not having U.S. citizenship?

Thanks.

Regards.

Posted by: Amiran Urusov on 04/14/2012

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77

 
 
 

Victoria Zuza Avatar

Spouse

Hello, My husband is graduating for Mos school two weeks from today and I was wondering about graduation day. Thanks in advance!
Semper Fi

Posted by: Victoria Zuza on 04/20/2012

Helpful?

63

 
 
 

edward stockdale Avatar

Family

hi i'm 14 i will be 15 soon i was wondering what are the requirements , and should i fill out the cards i get in the mail.

Posted by: edward stockdale on 05/30/2012

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51

 
 
 

Matthew  Johnson Avatar

Other

Good Afternoon,

My name is Matthew Johnson, and I am 23. I joined The U.S. Army when i graduated high school in 2007, and in 2009 ? 2010 I went overseas to Iraq. I am now an E-5 veteran with a contract ending on May 15th 2013. I am highly interested in knowing more about my options, although i am weary of these options as well. I would like to know how much of a reduction in rank would i get thrown, and if my medals and awards would still stand as they do now. I know the physical fitness test is different, and i am willing to give it a go. If there is someone i can talk to that knows more about requirements and the transitional phase, from U.S. Army to U.S. Marine…I would appreciate that.

Posted by: Matthew Johnson on 06/20/2012

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76

 
 
 

Christina Nichols Avatar

Other

I know a SSgt who switched from the Army to the Marines. I can get some information for you.

Posted by: Christina Nichols on 12/30/2012

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8

 
 
 

Danielle Sizemore Avatar

Other

My boyfriend left 2 weeks ago for Basic, I was wondering how long it takes to either recieve his address, or recieve a letter from him? His father and I have been waiting.

Posted by: Danielle Sizemore on 09/08/2012

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80

 
 
 

Christina Nichols Avatar

Other

By Basic Im assuming u mean bootcamp. The 1st week your BF will be in recieving and will not have an address, because he has not yet met his drill instructors. After the 1st week you can ask his recruiter or his parents should recieve a letter with his address.

Posted by: Christina Nichols on 12/30/2012

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7

 
 
 

Tyler Pepin Avatar

Supporter

so, im debating on joining the marines. after i get off work today. i might head down to the recruiting office that is just down the street. im 17. senior in high school. and want to know what the marines have in the course of electrical engineering. which when i get out. im going through the IBEW international brotherhood of electrical workers apprenticeship program local 40 which is in the hollywood area. guarantees a job in a studio like universal studios. im wanting to join the marines for the experience(:

Posted by: Tyler Pepin on 01/12/2013

Helpful?

3

 
 
 

Sammy Gallardo Avatar

Spouse

I just turned 25 mother if 2 & a Marine Vets wife. I've always wanted to serve but always had obstacles (age, school, family, etc) I just completed my BS in CCJ and wondering what my options would be. Only thing is my husband isn't really on board with the whole idea.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Thanks :)

Posted by: Sammy Gallardo on 01/15/2013

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5

 
 
 

Savannah Boisvert Avatar

Other

I am Ready!........ in 4 more years!

Posted by: Savannah Boisvert on 02/02/2013

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2

 
 
 

Gloria Sforza Avatar

Mother

If I can't swim can I still join the marines

Posted by: Gloria Sforza on 03/08/2013

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45

 
 
 
 
 
 
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